Author: Albert

Free Entertainment in San Juan, Puerto Rico

Puer­to Rico has one main export: music. Puer­to Ricans are raised on music and dance. It is no won­der, then, that find­ing free open-air con­certs is easy, pro­vid­ed you know where to look. Old San Juan There are sev­er­al free con­certs dur­ing the week in the Old City. On Paseo de la Prince­sa, bands and artists per­form on Sat­ur­days and Sun­days from mid-after­noon til 5–6 pm. The short street between the Old City’s south­ern fac­ing for­ti­fi­ca­tions is a farmer’s mar­ket, fes­ti­val, and street fair all in one. At the cen­ter of the activ­i­ty is a stage which hosts var­i­ous acts,...

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How to Make Homemade Salsa

Store bought sal­sa can nev­er com­pete with the taste of home­made sal­sa, and because sal­sa is so easy to make you can always make a whole lot and store it for lat­er use (or give it to fam­i­ly and friends as gifts). For the sake of this arti­cle to we are going to make enough sal­sa for 8 pints. You Will Need: * Toma­toes (the amount will depend on how much sal­sa you want to make but 15 pounds will make 8 pints of sal­sa) * 500ml Vine­gar or lemon juice (you will use vine­gar if you are using sal­sa sea­son­ing mix and lemon juice if you are mak­ing your own sea­son­ing) * Ball sal­sa mix or your own sea­son­ing * A big pot to ster­il­ize the jars in * Can­ning jars (pint size jars work best for sal­sa) * Met­al lids with gum binder * Met­al bands or rings to secure the lids * 2 or 3 large spoons * A pot for the toma­toes Step 1 You will need to remove the toma­to skins first. A quick and easy way of doing this is to put your toma­toes in a pot and cov­er them with boil­ing water for about 1 minute. The skins will slide right off! Step 2 Cut your peeled toma­toes in half and remove the excess water and seeds by squeez­ing each halve and scoop­ing out the seeds...

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Best Bread Pudding Recipe — Pumpkin Bread Pudding Recipe

  This pump­kin bread pud­ding is a great alter­na­tive to the tra­di­tion­al pump­kin pie. Stuffed with raisins and nuts, each bite will be a won­der­ful expe­ri­ence. 1⁄2 loaf raisin bread, cut into cubes 1 cup canned pump­kin 1⁄2 cup brown sug­ar 2 eggs 1 tea­spoon vanil­la 1⁄2 tea­spoon gin­ger 1 can evap­o­rat­ed milk 1⁄3 cup wal­nuts, chopped Direc­tions Pre­heat oven to 400 degrees. Grease an 9-inch pie plate. Place bread cubes into the pre­pared pie plate. In a medi­um bowl, com­bine the pump­kin, brown sug­ar, eggs, vanil­la and gin­ger. Stir in the milk. Pour mix­ture over bread cubes; be sure to coat cubes well. Sprin­kle wal­nuts on top. Bake 25 to 30 min­utes, or until knife insert­ed in mid­dle comes out clean. => Best Bread Pud­ding Recipe: Banana Bread Pud­ding Recipe If you love banana bread, then you’ll absolute­ly love this banana bread pud­ding. It’s made with mashed bananas, eggs, milk and French bread. 6 bananas, mashed 6 egg yolks 1 cup sug­ar 1 stick but­ter 1 can evap­o­rat­ed milk 1 can water 1 tea­spoon vanil­la 1 loaf French Bread, cut into cubes Direc­tions Pre­heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9x13-inch bak­ing dish. In a large bowl, com­bine the bread cubes and the milk and water; let soak until bread is soft. Sep­a­rate the egg yolks and whites. In the same bowl, mix in the egg yolks, vanil­la, but­ter...

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Basic Salsa Dance Steps

Mas­ter­ing the basic step will be the first key step to devel­op­ing prop­er tech­nique and tim­ing in sal­sa. Your spins and part­ner-work tech­niques will be exe­cut­ed in sync with the rhythm of the music once you have mas­tered your basic. Think of the basic step as the drum­mer in a band. It keeps you and your part­ner on time. I encour­age you to prac­tice these steps at home but it goes with out say­ing that online instruc­tion is no sub­sti­tute for real time stu­dio instruc­tion. There are many fin­er ele­ments of the basic step such as the Cuban hip...

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Tembleque de Coco

  I want to share with you a clas­sic Puer­to Rican desert recipe. This one is a treat, it is light coconut cus­tard that shakes like Jell-O. That is why it’s called tem­bleque, which can be loose­ly trans­lat­ed as jig­gling. Here is the recipe: o 2 cups of coconut milk o ½ cup of corn­starch o ¾ cups of sug­ar o ½ tea­spoon of salt o 1 tea­spoon vanil­la fla­vor­ing o Ground cin­na­mon (option­al) In a saucepan, at medi­um hi, heat the coconut milk, the sug­ar and the salt. Dilute the corn­starch with some of the coconut milk and add to the saucepan. Stir con­tin­u­ous­ly until it boils then sim­mer until it thick­ens. Pour mix­ture into a mold or sin­gle serv­ing cups what­ev­er you pre­fer. Let it cool to room tem­per­a­ture before refrig­er­at­ing for at least 2 hours. Sprin­kle cin­na­mon over it before serv­ing. Here are some tips to watch out for on this dish. Cool the mix­ture before refrig­er­at­ing or cov­er it with a plas­tic wrap so a skin does not devel­op, much like pud­ding. In addi­tion, before serv­ing you might have to sep­a­rate the tem­bleque from the mold with a knife. While cook­ing once the mix thick­ens remove imme­di­ate­ly from the heat or you will get a tem­bleque with­out the jig­gle that is more bread pud­ding than jell-o in con­sis­ten­cy. Tem­bleque is a clas­sic Puer­to Rican desert recipe...

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