Category: Arts & Leisure

¡Pa’lante, Siempre Pa’lante! The Young Lords

Iris Morales, 1996, 48 min In the midst of the African Amer­i­can lib­er­a­tion strug­gle, protests to end the Viet­nam War and the women’s move­ment for equal­i­ty, the Young Lords Par­ty emerged, rais­ing a mil­i­tant voice for the empow­er­ment of Puer­to Ricans and oth­er Latino/as in the Unit­ed States. Through inti­mate con­ver­sa­tions with for­mer mem­bers and archival footage, the doc­u­men­tary sur­veys Puer­to Rican his­to­ry as well as the Young Lords’ polit­i­cal vision and lega­cy. Screen­ing fol­lowed by a talk-back ses­sion with the film’s direc­tor, Iris Morales, high­light­ing her expe­ri­ence as the first female mem­ber of the Young Lords as well as...

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Bongos And Congas — Drums With A Difference

  If you are inter­est­ed in beats, then you are sure to be inter­est­ed in oth­er instru­ments besides the usu­al drums that can give you the right beats. Well then let us dis­cuss bon­gos and con­gas from the fam­i­ly of drums. Bon­go is a small ver­sion of drums. Actu­al­ly it is a com­pi­la­tion of two open-end­ed drums. These two drums are joined with each oth­er. Drum heads are nor­mal­ly made of ani­mal skins, but plas­tic made drum heads are also avail­able. The body is made of met­al, wood and some­times with ceram­ic also. Both the bon­gos are of dif­fer­ent...

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Jose Campeche — Puerto Rico’s Best Rococo Artist

Jose Campeche is an 18th cen­tu­ry artist from San Juan, Puer­to Rico who earned mer­its for his coun­try and the Puer­to Rico flag for his works in the field of visu­al arts. Born to a for­mer Puer­to Rican slave, Tomas Campeche, and a moth­er native of the Canary Islands, Maria Mar­quez, he was a per­son with mixed roots — a mulat­to. It might be said that his expo­sure to var­i­ous cul­tures cat­a­pult­ed him into suc­cess­ful­ly becom­ing the first “known” visu­al artist of his coun­try. Campeche’s incli­na­tion towards the arts start­ed out ear­ly, and is often cred­it­ed to his father,...

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10 Reasons To Dance Salsa

  By now, the Sal­sa craze seems to have hit every city, with clubs and dance stu­dios pop­ping every­where. Pop­u­lar tele­vi­sion shows such as So You Think You Can Dance and Danc­ing With the Stars have sparked inter­est in an entire­ly new audi­ence that, oth­er­wise, would nev­er have tak­en any kind of part­ner dance class. It just proves that we all have a dancer with­in wait­ing to come out. “What if I have absolute­ly zero dance expe­ri­ence?” you may be ask­ing. Then Sal­sa is per­fect for you. Peo­ple of all ages and back­grounds, male and female, are tak­ing class­es to learn to dance Sal­sa. And mas­ter­ing Sal­sa dance steps is not as dif­fi­cult as you may think. The impor­tant thing to remem­ber when danc­ing Sal­sa is that it’s not just steps, it is a feel­ing. The word “Sal­sa,” the Span­ish word for sauce, was orig­i­nal­ly used to con­vey the hot and spicy “feel­ings” behind the move­ments. Nowa­days, the word “Sal­sa” is rec­og­nized and wide­ly accept­ed as the actu­al form of dance. Peo­ple learn to dance for many dif­fer­ent rea­sons. Some take dance class­es with seri­ous inten­tions of mas­ter­ing the art form. Oth­ers take dance class­es to stay in shape and main­tain a healthy lifestyle. Still oth­ers may join a class for fun or as a way to con­nect with oth­ers. What­ev­er your rea­son for learn­ing to dance, you will...

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‘El Coqui Espectacular and the Bottle of Doom’

The comic book play looks at the societal expectations of Latino cultural identity through superhero fantasy and lots of comedy. BY Moni­ka Fabi­an | NEW YORK DAILY NEWS For Lati­nos, cul­tur­al iden­ti­ty can be a mine­field. They can gain or lose jobs for being deemed “too Lati­no” or not Lati­no enough. The com­ic book play “El Coquí Espec­tac­u­lar and the Bot­tle of Doom” exam­ines these soci­etal expec­ta­tions and turns them on their head with some super­hero fan­ta­sy and lots of com­e­dy. In “El Coquí,” a Nuy­or­i­can com­ic book artist strug­gles with claims that his work is “too Puer­to Rican,”...

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