Category: Recipes

Tembleque de Coco

  I want to share with you a classic Puerto Rican desert recipe. This one is a treat, it is light coconut custard that shakes like Jell-O. That is why it’s called tembleque, which can be loosely translated as jiggling. Here is the recipe: o 2 cups of coconut milk o ½ cup of cornstarch o ¾ cups of sugar o ½ teaspoon of salt o 1 teaspoon vanilla flavoring o Ground cinnamon (optional) In a saucepan, at medium hi, heat the coconut milk, the sugar and the salt. Dilute the cornstarch with some of the coconut milk and add to the saucepan. Stir continuously until it boils then simmer until it thickens. Pour mixture into a mold or single serving cups whatever you prefer. Let it cool to room temperature before refrigerating for at least 2 hours. Sprinkle cinnamon over it before serving. Here are some tips to watch out for on this dish. Cool the mixture before refrigerating or cover it with a plastic wrap so a skin does not develop, much like pudding. In addition, before serving you might have to separate the tembleque from the mold with a knife. While cooking once the mix thickens remove immediately from the heat or you will get a tembleque without the jiggle that is more bread pudding than jell-o in consistency. Tembleque is a classic Puerto Rican desert...

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How to Make a Traditional Puerto Rican Thanksgiving Day Dinner

  Even though Thanksgiving was not always a traditional holiday on the island, many Puerto Rican families calling the States home began celebrating it by adding a touch of Sabor Latino. A traditional Puerto Rican Thanksgiving menu will likely consist of Pavochon, Mofongo stuffing, Arroz con Gandules (rice with pigeon peas), Tostones, and Tembleque or dulce de leche. I serve a green bean casserole with my meal and for an appetizer I fry up some Platanos versus the Tostones. I season mine with garlic, black pepper and salt and serve them with Mojo Criollo. I’m usually cooking enough food...

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The Best of Puerto Rican Food

Puerto Rican food is a mixture of African, Taino, and Spanish influences. They have their own take on creole food, which they call cocina criolla. This cooking style is not only popular with locals; tourists also frequent Puerto Rico to experience authentic creole dishes, as well. The country of Puerto Rico has different types of dishes that have become part of the locals’ daily diet. One is called pastelon de carne, which is a pie made of meat such as ham and/or pork. You can buy these at restaurants and shops lining the streets, and some creative cooks have even placed a Puerto Rican flag on top of it as décor. Another favorite is carne frita con cebolla, which is made up of beef and onions. Then there’s chicken with rice, or Arroz con pollo, which is quite popular, as well as other chicken dishes like sour chicken or broiled chicken. A Spanish-inspired omelet with potatoes and onions is called the Tortilla Espanola. Puerto Rican meals are also known for its extensive use of beef tongue, brains, and kidneys. Interestingly, daily Puerto Rico dining normally includes appetizers. Some appetizers that are favorites of locals are empanadillas or turnovers with crab or lobster filling, and bacalaitos or crispy fritters made with cod. They also serve soup like sopon de pescado, which is fish soup, and sopon de pollo con arroz,...

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Desserts From Around the World – Puerto Rican Tembleque De Coco

[ad_1] If you like jello recipes, you will love this Puerto Rican coconut custard recipe. The word “tembleque” means jiggling, which is something that all the best jello recipes do! This coconut milk based pudding is associated with Puerto Rico and it is believed to have originated there. This dessert is also popular in other Latin American areas and, because coconut milk is so widely used in Southeast Asian cuisine, similar dishes are also served there. Handy Tembleque Making Tips It is important to let the mixture cool down before you put it in the refrigerator. If you do...

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Getting Veal Hungry in San Juan, Puerto Rico

By Phil Vettel Confit salmon with quinoa, plantain, herb pesto okra and a pimento vinaigrette served at 1919 restaurant. – MCT photos Ready for some interesting food choices in San Juan? THE island of Puerto Rico offers so many visual treats – gorgeous beaches, rugged hills, beautiful churches and majestic historic forts – that dining just about becomes an afterthought. A chunk of meat or fish, some sides of mofongo (fried mashed plantains) and mamposteao (rice and beans with other goodies), a stiff rum drink and you’re good to go, right? Well, yes, that’ll do nicely much of the...

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