Category: Misc

History Of Salsa

Sal­sa is def­i­nite­ly one of the most roman­tic dances out there. It’s a dance of seduc­tion and pas­sion, char­ac­ter­ized by very sen­su­al move­ments and a lot of hip action. It’s also a ter­rif­ic dance for begin­ners. It’s a great choice if you want to start learn­ing Latin Amer­i­can Dances. It’s easy to learn, it’s fun, and it doesn’t involve too much tech­nique. Basi­cal­ly, it can be learnt by any­one. If you can walk, you can def­i­nite­ly learn how to dance Sal­sa. In this arti­cle we’re going to take a brief tour through the his­to­ry of Sal­sa. The his­to­ry of this Latin-Amer­i­can dance is not eas­i­ly defined. We can say it’s a fusion of many Latin and Afro-Caribbean dances that has evolved sig­nif­i­cant­ly over time. Some say it orig­i­nat­ed in Cuba, oth­er say Puer­to Rico. We’ll prob­a­bly nev­er know. What we do know for sure is that it’s very pop­u­lar all around the world and still remains one of the main dances in both Cuba and Puer­to Rico. What about the word “Sal­sa”? That’s an inter­est­ing ques­tion. The word means “sauce” in Span­ish lan­guage. In 1930s when Cuban com­pos­er Igna­cio Pine­r­io wrote the song Echale Sal­si­ta, this word became a pop­u­lar nick­name for many dances of Latin Amer­i­can ori­gins, includ­ing rhum­ba, cha cha, mam­bo, dan­zon, merengue, guaracha, and oth­ers. (ads­by­google = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); We could say that many of...

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Free Entertainment in San Juan, Puerto Rico

Puer­to Rico has one main export: music. Puer­to Ricans are raised on music and dance. It is no won­der, then, that find­ing free open-air con­certs is easy, pro­vid­ed you know where to look. Old San Juan There are sev­er­al free con­certs dur­ing the week in the Old City. On Paseo de la Prince­sa, bands and artists per­form on Sat­ur­days and Sun­days from mid-after­noon til 5–6 pm. The short street between the Old City’s south­ern fac­ing for­ti­fi­ca­tions is a farmer’s mar­ket, fes­ti­val, and street fair all in one. At the cen­ter of the activ­i­ty is a stage which hosts var­i­ous acts,...

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How to Make Homemade Salsa

Store bought sal­sa can nev­er com­pete with the taste of home­made sal­sa, and because sal­sa is so easy to make you can always make a whole lot and store it for lat­er use (or give it to fam­i­ly and friends as gifts). For the sake of this arti­cle to we are going to make enough sal­sa for 8 pints. You Will Need: * Toma­toes (the amount will depend on how much sal­sa you want to make but 15 pounds will make 8 pints of sal­sa) * 500ml Vine­gar or lemon juice (you will use vine­gar if you are using sal­sa sea­son­ing mix and lemon juice if you are mak­ing your own sea­son­ing) * Ball sal­sa mix or your own sea­son­ing * A big pot to ster­il­ize the jars in * Can­ning jars (pint size jars work best for sal­sa) * Met­al lids with gum binder * Met­al bands or rings to secure the lids * 2 or 3 large spoons * A pot for the toma­toes Step 1 You will need to remove the toma­to skins first. A quick and easy way of doing this is to put your toma­toes in a pot and cov­er them with boil­ing water for about 1 minute. The skins will slide right off! Step 2 Cut your peeled toma­toes in half and remove the excess water and seeds by squeez­ing each halve and scoop­ing out the seeds...

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10 Reasons To Dance Salsa

  By now, the Sal­sa craze seems to have hit every city, with clubs and dance stu­dios pop­ping every­where. Pop­u­lar tele­vi­sion shows such as So You Think You Can Dance and Danc­ing With the Stars have sparked inter­est in an entire­ly new audi­ence that, oth­er­wise, would nev­er have tak­en any kind of part­ner dance class. It just proves that we all have a dancer with­in wait­ing to come out. “What if I have absolute­ly zero dance expe­ri­ence?” you may be ask­ing. Then Sal­sa is per­fect for you. Peo­ple of all ages and back­grounds, male and female, are tak­ing class­es to learn to dance Sal­sa. And mas­ter­ing Sal­sa dance steps is not as dif­fi­cult as you may think. The impor­tant thing to remem­ber when danc­ing Sal­sa is that it’s not just steps, it is a feel­ing. The word “Sal­sa,” the Span­ish word for sauce, was orig­i­nal­ly used to con­vey the hot and spicy “feel­ings” behind the move­ments. Nowa­days, the word “Sal­sa” is rec­og­nized and wide­ly accept­ed as the actu­al form of dance. Peo­ple learn to dance for many dif­fer­ent rea­sons. Some take dance class­es with seri­ous inten­tions of mas­ter­ing the art form. Oth­ers take dance class­es to stay in shape and main­tain a healthy lifestyle. Still oth­ers may join a class for fun or as a way to con­nect with oth­ers. What­ev­er your rea­son for learn­ing to dance, you will...

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The Best of Puerto Rican Food

Puer­to Rican food is a mix­ture of African, Taino, and Span­ish influ­ences. They have their own take on cre­ole food, which they call coci­na criol­la. This cook­ing style is not only pop­u­lar with locals; tourists also fre­quent Puer­to Rico to expe­ri­ence authen­tic cre­ole dish­es, as well. The coun­try of Puer­to Rico has dif­fer­ent types of dish­es that have become part of the locals’ dai­ly diet. One is called pastelon de carne, which is a pie made of meat such as ham and/or pork. You can buy these at restau­rants and shops lin­ing the streets, and some cre­ative cooks have even placed a Puer­to Rican flag on top of it as décor. Anoth­er favorite is carne fri­ta con cebol­la, which is made up of beef and onions. Then there’s chick­en with rice, or Arroz con pol­lo, which is quite pop­u­lar, as well as oth­er chick­en dish­es like sour chick­en or broiled chick­en. A Span­ish-inspired omelet with pota­toes and onions is called the Tor­tilla Espanola. Puer­to Rican meals are also known for its exten­sive use of beef tongue, brains, and kid­neys. Inter­est­ing­ly, dai­ly Puer­to Rico din­ing nor­mal­ly includes appe­tiz­ers. Some appe­tiz­ers that are favorites of locals are empanadil­las or turnovers with crab or lob­ster fill­ing, and bacalaitos or crispy frit­ters made with cod. They also serve soup like sopon de pesca­do, which is fish soup, and sopon de pol­lo con arroz,...

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